Caribbean Climate Watch – June Edition

Caribbean Climate Watch – June Edition

Welcome to Caribbean Climate Watch! Below are some of the major climate change headlines regionally and internationally. 

Have a read!

Regional

UNDP: The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) office for Barbados and the OECS has awarded complementary funding of approximately US$600,000 to 5 countries (Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, the Commonwealth of Dominica, Saint Lucia and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines) that have applied for funding to improve their climate financing applications. Under the agency’s EnGender project, the funds will be used to ensure that each country’s applications for Climate change adaptation/ mitigation initiatives incorporate gender equality and inclusiveness and will leverage a significantly larger sum of climate financing. Read more.

CCRIF: The Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility’s Caribbean member states have renewed their parametric insurance coverage for tropical cyclone, excess rainfall, earthquake and fisheries ahead of the upcoming 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season, ceding over US$1 billion in risk to CCRIF and increasing overall coverage by 8 per cent. Read more.

Dominica News: Dominica is set to receive support from Canada under the Canada-CARICOM Climate Adaptation Fund. The Canadian High Commission says it will provide support for Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CCRIF) premiums and targeted technical assistance. Dominica will be eligible to receive CAD $1.8M towards CCRIF premiums. Read more.

Barbados Today: The Barbados Water Authority has launched a major Water Infrastructure Rehabilitation Project, which is being funded by the the European Investment Bank (EIB), and the Latin American Development Bank (CAF) in the form of a loan agreement. The project is intended to reduce and control unaccounted for water losses and  improve climate change resilience and sustainability, over a four-year period. Read more.

CANARI: Civil society in Trinidad and Tobago is urging accelerated action on climate change for sustainable development and COVID-19 recovery. This was the main message as civil society launched its report on Sustainable Development Goal #13 – Climate Action. Read more.

International

Climate Home: The UK has announced its intention to close the Department for International Development (Dfid) and the creation of a new Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office during a recently held parliamentary session. However, aid experts are expressing concerns that such a move could prioritise political motives over assistance to vulnerable countries, as international aid could be shifted from those countries facing intensifying climate impacts, to middle-income countries better placed to advance the UK’s interests overseas. Read more.

Commonwealth: The Commonwealth Secretariat is aiming to assist Caribbean countries in building climate resilience through the use of rapid mapping technology, as the region braces for a busy hurricane season. In partnership with the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). Commonwealth head, Patricia Scotland says the technology “will help generate the data countries need to inform critical decision-making during times of crisis. It will also lead to more effective climate projects in the long-term and more robust applications for climate finance.” Read more.

Climate Home: The UK, the host of the next UN Climate Change conference (COP26), risks missing the crucial deadline of submitting tougher climate change commitments. While expected to deliver an exemplar commitments, the UK’s current timeline leave very little room for completion by the end of 2020. Read more.

Climate Home: Ireland’s recently formed coalition government, has signalled its intention to reduce the country’s greenhouse gas emissions by an average 7% per year, adding up to 51% by 2030. They promised to enshrine in law a target to reach net zero emissions by 2050, in the government’s first 100 days in office, and deliver a “green” economic recovery to the Covid-19 crisis. Read more.


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